Students participate in special education inclusion talent show

Senior+Cal+Coyne+grins+as+he+walks+up+on+stage+while+the+audience+sings+to+him+on+his+18th+birthday.
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Students participate in special education inclusion talent show

Senior Cal Coyne grins as he walks up on stage while the audience sings to him on his 18th birthday.

Senior Cal Coyne grins as he walks up on stage while the audience sings to him on his 18th birthday.

Mike Baldus

Senior Cal Coyne grins as he walks up on stage while the audience sings to him on his 18th birthday.

Mike Baldus

Mike Baldus

Senior Cal Coyne grins as he walks up on stage while the audience sings to him on his 18th birthday.

Emma Manzo, Reporter

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Jeremy Wiebenga held the 2nd annual special education inclusion talent show during third hour on Oct. 18. The audience was enthusiastic and supportive; they cheered, clapped, even waved 10 signs. The performances ranged from dancing and singing to comedy and an artwork display.

“It was super cute,” junior Delaney Brockmyre said. “I think both groups had an overall great experience.”  

The crowd gave a standing ovation for every act from Brianna Smith’s dance to Justin Bieber’s “Baby” and Maddison Zant’s rendition of “True Colors” to the comedy of Mark Wright. For one performance, everyone was invited up on stage to do the “Cha-Cha Slide” with the dance team and the crowd went wild. Even Bucco came to support the students and participated in the group dance. 

Towards the end of the show, the audience sang to Cal Coyne for his 18th birthday. 

“I think it gave our student body the opportunity to see some cool things from our kiddos,” Wiebenga said.

According to Wiebenga, the show was an improvement from last year with microphones, lights and a real stage. The audience also increased from about 80 to 300 students. Next year Wiebenga hopes to include more acts with both general and special education. 

“It allowed our students the opportunity to, kind of, face their fears a little bit and feel comfortable on stage and feel the love from the student body,” Wiebenga said.

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